Results
(114 Answers)

Answer Explanations

In select cases
user-273449

This question needs to be rephrased: monitoring devices can motivate exercise which in the long run can save lives. The timeframe needs to be specified in the questions to produce reliable results.

In select cases
user-933346

The sensor resolution is not medical grade, but can provide valuable assessment.

Yes
user-658291

This technology is very good for monitoring patient's cardiac rhythms.

In select cases
user-834630

Smart watches are limited in their capabilities to adequately diagnose heart conditions, however they have the potential to show both trends in vital signs over time and detect simple arrhythmias that could lead to a patient seeking medical attention.

In select cases
user-165049

Smart watches are able to alert patients but if no knowledge on the use of the device or action is taken by seeking healthcare intervention then the device is useless

In select cases
user-946345

Moreso in detection of atrial fibrillation and Ventricular arrhythmias

In select cases
user-104260

diagnosing rhythm abnormalities

In select cases
user-646901

the most striking example would be atrial fibrillation that can be earlier detected and treated. Other arguments like sending emergency messages after "events" to relatives or doctors may also contribute

In select cases
user-182633

Unpredictable results

Yes
user-377267

heart monitoring is a significant contribution to saving lives if reasonably managed.

Not yet
user-547683

Smart watches gadtets can detect irregular rhythms, which might be mostly relevant to detect subclinical atrial fibrillation (AF). While this seems feasible and has been proven to be accurate in the diagnosis of AF, there are some challenges that need answering. Namely, whether subclinical AF is a harbinger of the same risk as AF detected in the clinic, and, especially, whether implementing strategies in a rather low-risk unselected population may reduce risk of major adverse cardiovascular outcomes. As for the last point, we currently lack good predictive tools, especially in patients at seemingly low-risk as per the CHA2DS2-VAsc score.

Yes
user-567257

it depends on the model and algorythm and connectivity to a RPM platform

I cannot answer
user-698057

There are no available data on how these device could save lives

In select cases
user-816808

Because level of clothing may not be able to monitor

In select cases
user-932521

There is much error, both operational (patient unsure how to operate monitors) and technological (devices dont always produce accurate data).

Yes
user-678105

The diagnosis and duration of afib can be monitored and appropriate decisions made.

In select cases
user-441980

In Case of unusual notification, if instructed earlier, smartwatches with heart monitoring abilities will trigger a person for consultation. This may contribute to saving lives.

In select cases
user-623341

depend on types of arrythmia

In select cases
DrAndyDABT

If the watch is able to monitor heart rhythm, then they could be used to flag a person for follow up with their doctor for a possible arrhythmia. This could also be used to look for heart attack and alert the wearer. I don't think the technology is good enough where you could notify 911 of a possible hart attack, but possibly an alert to the wearer or chosen emergency contacts. Technology where it is paired with a ring on the other hand that can get a much better heart rhythm by measuring electrical currents on both hands would be more accurate, but more cumbersome to have to wear two things.

Not yet
user-532952

I am a Professor in Health Sciences and have a heart condition and an expensive watch linked to my I phone. Both need charging and have short battery lives. Mostly off line when I need them as there is load shedding in South Africa. Both are locked in a drawer...

I cannot answer
tox-expert

I don't have the requisite expertise to participate in this survey.

Not yet
user-200863

I think they are not evolved to the point that it can replace instruments that are specifically designed for it.

In select cases
user-800750

Smart watches may help detect stress levels, heart rate variability and risk of arrythmias in selec cases (e.g. Oreel, T.H., Delespaul, P., Hartog, I.D. et al. Ecological momentary assessment versus retrospective assessment for measuring change in health-related quality of life following cardiac intervention. J Patient Rep Outcomes 4, 98 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s41687-020-00261-2; an der Krieke L, Emerencia AC, Bos EH, Rosmalen JG, Riese H, Aiello M, Sytema S, de Jonge P. Ecological Momentary Assessments and Automated Time Series Analysis to Promote Tailored Health Care: A Proof-of-Principle Study. JMIR Res Protoc 2015;4(3):e100 doi: 10.2196/resprot.4000; Jean FAM, Sibon I, Husky M, Couffinhal T, Swendsen J. Feasibility and validity of Ecological Momentary Assessment in patients with acute coronary syndrome. BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2020 Nov 27;20(1):499. doi: 10.1186/s12872-020-01774-w; Stark K, Czermak T, Massberg S, Orban M. Watch out for ST-elevation myocardial infarction: a case report of ST-elevation in single-lead electrocardiogram tracing of a smartwatch. Eur Heart J Case Rep. 2020 Nov 18;4(6):1-4. doi: 10.1093/ehjcr/ytaa353).

In select cases
user-604552

They cannot detect any kind of malfunction but just some

In select cases
user-32342

Provide guidance to those with desire and interest in improving their fitness and overall health, in some instances the device may also provide information for their providers to assist in tracking changes in health or fitness levels

In select cases
user-819042

It shows vitals throughout the time, and one can monitor them. If the vitals are abnormal, immediate interventions can be made to save the life.

Yes
user-664651

There are anecdotal reports case studies showing that is the case

Yes
user-536513

Information to report a defect otherwise not detected could alert attending physician to a potentially lethal event.

In select cases
user-125195

To the extent that the devices are worn properly they can measure key cardio and other physiological activities and with improvements in software and hardware design they have the potential to do this better with time. However, the technologies are not perfect and if the devices are not worn or if they not fit properly they will not measure nor “diagnose” the key parameters needed to evaluate the state of health and whether or not an emergency situation has been encountered and help should be called

In select cases
user-989153

Smart watches with heart monitoring technology could identify and warn people at risk and in obvious cases.

In select cases
user-394368

If AF detected, it still needs to be confirmed by ECG (12-lead); if confirmed AF, then anticoagulant can prevent thromboembolic stroke, which may be fatal.

In select cases
user-89655

They give a readout but the data needs to be taken in context of the overall well-being of the individual.

No
user-320876

The electromagnetic activities of 'smart heart monitors' are likely to disturb or damage, to varying degrees, the body's complex electrochemical network of immune neuroplasticity. Depending on several factors (age, individual's health status, extent of exposures and tissue vulnerability toward electromagnetic charges) the extent of tissue damage may vary.

Yes
user-38414

If it can connect to a cell phone, the device can call Emergency service as soon as possible.

Not yet
user-913436

Currently, there is an opening in the medical community towards wearable devices for monitoring diverse physiologic functions - most frequently heart rate. Guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation (a frequent heart rhythm anomaly that increases the risk of stroke, that oftentimes is silent or asymptomatic) suggest to consider these tools in selected patients to screen the presence of atrial fibrillation and therefore help an early diagnosis. It can be used in selected populations for monitoring exercise-based interventions.
Experimental devices capable of monitoring combined physiological functions have proved in a single study to early identify future decompensation in patients suffering from heart failure, therefore signaling a problem and suggesting to seek medical advice before symptoms get worse. However, there is not enough data to suggest this in the heart failure population, and even less in the general population.

Yes
user-622747

it is will known that promoting behaviour self-monitroing can have impact in promoting health behaviour

Yes
user-674106

Of course, they can be useful in selected cases, but everything in this world is useful only in selected cases. So, I don`t see the differences between these two variants and the direct answer is "yes". Early registration of ECG abnormalities can save vital minutes and, thereby, lives.

Not yet
user-622574

Algorithms for heart monitoring developed for clinical devices cannot directly be transferred to wearable devices as data obtained by the latter devices are less reliable. Moreover, algorithms transferred or developed for wearable devices still used clinically-oriented but not health-oriented methodologies to save lives in everyday life (see Davydov, D. M. (2018). Health in medicine: The lost graal. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 111, 22–26).

Yes
user-826635

in case of tachycardia and bradycardia they can always refer themselves to a cardiologist

In select cases
user-949839

In patients with atrial fibrillation, probably for other diseases in the future, it can help detect when the problem is active and prompt early intervention

In select cases
user-863919

individuals at risk of life-threatening tachyarrhythmias

Yes
user-897569

Scientific evidence from studies.

Not yet
user-737405

Detection of some heart conditions is possible, but the integrated system of response is not there yet

In select cases
basucall

If the heart pulse is usually high and the person has arrhythmia, it may alert for a medical intervention

In select cases
user-371283

detecting atrial fibrillation and starting anticoagulants

No
user-271581

Because the data will not be used in a good way by everybody. People need to know what the data means and if anything is wrong should be able to understand it

Yes
user-487852

Our heart pulse and rates are critical to our active lives. If there are monitors and indicators that could point to changes in it normal rates, then lives could be saved. Wearable devices can be an important aspect in future medicine

In select cases
user-346054

Detection of cardiac arrhythmia such as Atrial Fibrillation

Yes
user-907789

Heart rates less than 60 beats per minute or greater than 100 beats per minute would indicate bradycardia or tachycardia and alert the user to see their health care provider for further evaluation. Abnormal rhythms are also detected by the device and this awareness can be life saving

Yes
user-198903

They allow both self monitoring, remote reporting and interact with different sensors to match data

Yes
user-600998

Asystole, tachy/bradycardia, and arrhythmias could all be life-threatening. Applied to millions of users, there will, undoubtably, be lives saved.

0
user-481195
01/18/2024 10:26
In my view in some extent to save the lives of human.
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